Chihuahua Sent to Fort Marion, FL (April 1886)

When Crook arrived at Fort Bowie, President Grover Cleveland vetoed the negotiated terms.

“The President cannot assent to the surrender of the hostiles on the terms of their imprisonment East for two years with … their return to the reservation. He instructs you to enter again into negotiations on the terms of their unconditional surrender, only sparing their lives…. You must make at once such disposition of your troops as will insure against further hostilities by completing the destruction of the hostiles unless these terms are acceded to.”  (General Philip Henry Sheridan, Commanding General of the Army, to General George Crook, Commander, Department of Arizona, March 30, 1886.)

Crook withheld this information from the Chiricahuas.

” … I shall not inform them that the President has disapproved the terms upon which I accepted their surrender…. I can communicate nothing to them through (the) interpreter without every one knowing what is said and if the fact was known, it would absolutely prevent the return of any of the others, and unless this war is ended by the surrender of the hostiles it is likely to last for years.”  (General George Crook, Commander, Department of Arizona, to General Philip Henry Sheridan, Commanding General of the Army. March 30, 1886.)

On April 7, 1886, President Cleveland sent Chihuahua and 76 others to Fort Marion, St. Augustine, Florida.

Philip Henry Sheridan, Commanding General of the Army, held Crook responsible for Geronimo’s departure. On April 2, 1886, Sheridan replaced Crook with General Nelson Miles, who became Commander of the Department of Arizona.

“I want you to immediately organize as strong a body of troops as you deem necessary, to follow up and re-enforce the troops now in Mexico in pursuit of hostile Indians. These Indians must be followed up until they are killed or captured.”  (General Philip Henry Sheridan, Commanding General of the Army, to General Nelson Miles, Commander, Department of Arizona, April 2, 1886.

Previous Page Peace Negotiations (March 1886)

Next Page Miles Negotiates Peace with Naiche and Geronimo (Sept 1886)