Creating the Hot Springs Reservation (1874)

 

EXECUTIVE MANSION, April 9, 1874.

It is hereby ordered that the following-described tract of country in the Territory of New Mexico be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and reserved for the use and occupation of such Indians as the Secretary of the Interior may see fit to locate thereon, as indicated in this diagram, viz:

 Beginning at the ruins of an ancient pueblo in the valley of the Cañada Alamosa River, about 7 miles above the present town of Cañada Alamosa, and running thence due east 10 miles; thence due north 25 miles; thence due west 30 miles; thence due south 25 miles; thence due east 20 miles to the place of beginning.

U. S. GRANT.


EXECUTIVE MANSION, December 21, 1875.

It is hereby ordered that the tract of country in the Territory of New Mexico, lying within the following-described boundaries, viz:

Beginning at a point on the east side of the Cañada about 1,000 yards directly east of the ruins of an ancient pueblo in the valley of Cañada Alamosa River—about 7 miles above the town of Cañada Alamosa, and running thence due north 20 miles to a point; thence due west 20 miles to a point; thence due south 35 miles to a point; thence due east 20 miles to a point due south of the place of beginning; thence due north to the place of beginning, be, and the same is hereby, withdrawn from sale and set apart for the use and occupancy of the Southern Apache and such other Indians as it may be determined to place thereon, to be known as the “Hot Springs Indian Reservation;” and all that portion of country set apart by Executive order of April 9, 1874, not embraced within the limits of the above-described tract of country, is hereby restored to the public domain.

U. S. GRANT.

Kappler, C. J. (ed.). 1904. Indian Affairs: Laws and Treaties, Volume I. Government Printing Office, Washington D.C.

http://digital.library.okstate.edu/kappler/vol1/html_files/ARI0801.html#az. (Accessed 27 February 3, 2010)